Children's Books, Literacy Resources

Comprehension Strategies

The following are strategies for understanding what you read.

Visualization is Powerful ●Tell students to form a movie in their head as they read.

●You can lead them into this by having them draw as you read aloud.

●Use think alouds.

However, NONE of these comprehension strategies is taught in a single mini-lesson. It’s impossible to teach visualization in 15 minutes. Rather, plan and deliver numerous mini-lessons across the year that target the array of sub-skills that will prepare students to visualize independently.


LEARN TO MAKE CONNECTIONS

text to self – This reminds me of my own life…

When picking text to self books, it is important to look for books that have a theme that kids can relate to. Family, sibling rivalry, pets, school, or feelings are a great place to start. The characters also need to be realistic, especially for older kids. 


text to text– This reminds me of another book I’ve read/movie I’ve watched…


text to world– This reminds me this time in history/what’s going on in the world right now…

Excellent Resources:

●Harvey, S. & Goudvis, A. (2000). Strategies that work: Teaching comprehension to enhance understanding. Portland, ME: Stenhouse. ●Keene, E. & Zimmerman, S. (1997). Mosaic of Thought. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

●Tovani, C. (2000). I read it, but I don’t get it: Comprehension strategies for adolescent readers. Portland, ME: Steinhouse.

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Literacy Resources

CLOSE READING

Close reading is thoughtful, critical analysis of a text that focuses on significant details or patterns in order to develop a deep, precise understanding of the text’s form, craft, meanings, etc. It is a key requirement of the Common Core State Standards and directs the reader’s attention to the text itself. The skills gained from close reading help students locate information more easily and develop comprehension.

Strategies for Close Reading:

•Use Think Alouds    

Model it often. For example,

I might say, “I see a word I don’t know. I’m going to circle it or write it in my personal dictionary and find out what it means.”

Make connections as you read. “I think the Empire State Building must be as tall as a roller coaster I saw once.”

Ask questions: “What evidence or proof do we have that bats are nocturnal?”

1.Sequence: Which event happened first? Which happened last?

2.Character Traits: Name one character. What is one trait you infer that character has? Explain why you think that.

3.Motive: What is something that person does? Why do you think that person does that?

4.Summarize: Summarize the story in four sentences. Tell about the characters and what they do.

5.Main Idea: What do you think is the main idea of the story? Why? 



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